More Weird Toilet Rules for Athletes, Tourists in Sochi Olympics (VIDEOS)

  • Rate this Story
  • 0
  • 0

By Vittorio Hernandez | February 6, 2014 10:13 AM EST

REUTERS
A common set-up for modern, indoor plumbing with a toilet and sink is displayed at The Plumbing Museum in Watertown, Massachusetts November 19, 2013, which the United Nations declared World Toilet Day. About 2.5 billion people do not have access to adequate sanitation, a problem that contributes to countess deaths from preventable diseases, according to the United Nations. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

Related Articles

YouTube/BBC News

Russian Winter Olympic Games organisers appear to have a fixation with toilets.

First, they made the mistake of placing two toilet bowls in one cubicle, prompting viral comments on social media about the arrangement.

While the Russians may have learned their lesson about privacy concerns of most non-Russians when peeing or defecating, again the toilet cropped up in media reports just days before the opening of the Sochi Olympics.

A poster containing 6 rules on toilet use was spotted by Canadian snowboarder Sebastien Toutant. The Canadian athlete took a picture of the six which has one do and five don'ts.

YouTube/World News

The most prominent of the don'ts which many guests would find odd, to say the least, are that no urinating among men allowed on the bowl - which presumes there are enough urinals with dividers around - and defecating on a squat position is not allowed.

The latter would probably be difficult for Chinese athletes who are used to the squat position when moving their bowels.

YouTube/China Uncensored

Also banned are fishing - who would really want to cast a line on a commode - and throwing up on the toilet bowl. Although this rule is not in the poster, toilet paper is also banned from being flushed in the bowl, according to a tweet by Greg Wyshynski.

The weird toilet rules are just one of the more memorable things the Sochi games would be known for years after the last medal has been awarded.

Business Insider reports that construction work is still ongoing around the Olympic Park and several hotels as athletes, media and tourists start to arrive in the once unknown Russian city.

More noteworthy are the nightmare anecdotes of those who are already in Sochi.

Stacy St Clair recounted water running out of the tap and when it flowed again, out came a yellow liquid which explains why the hotel where she is staying had a warning sign that reads: "Do not use on your face because it contains something very dangerous." The situation left Ms St Clair with no choice except to wash her face with Evian "like I'm a Kardashian or something."

Another male hotel guest noted that the Internet cable connection is dangling from the ceiling of his room, which is still lucky because Charles Robinson's hotel room has no Wifi, TV, heat, shower curtain or working lock on the front door.

A journalist found a construction worker asleep on his bed and when transferred discovered a stray dog in the room. Another journalist noted the semen-covered bed in his room.

Other complaints include hotels with no elevators, electricity, lobby and hot water.

Because of these lapses despite the millions of dollars poured into the mid-sized resort town with no infrastructure when it won the bid in 2007 to host the winter games, there is much talk that corruption is the root of these embarrassing things that Sochi will likely be best remembered.

To contact the editor, e-mail:

(Photo: REUTERS / )
A common set-up for modern, indoor plumbing with a toilet and sink is displayed at The Plumbing Museum in Watertown, Massachusetts November 19, 2013, which the United Nations declared World Toilet Day. About 2.5 billion people do not have access to adequate sanitation, a problem that contributes to countess deaths from preventable diseases, according to the United Nations. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
  • Rate this Story
  • 0
  • 0
This article is copyrighted by IBTimes.com.au, the business news leader

Join the Conversation

IBTimes TV
E-Newsletters

We value your privacy. Your email address will not be shared.