Canada’s First Test Tube Baby Now a Dad, Own Son Conceived and Born the Natural Way

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By Esther Tanquintic-Misa | February 5, 2014 1:07 PM EST

A woman pushes a baby stroller through a cloud of steam from a construction site in Boston, Massachusetts January 7, 2014. A deadly blast of arctic air that shattered decades-old records as it gripped the middle United States moved eastward on Tuesday, canceling thousands of flights, paralyzing road travel and closing schools and businesses.    REUTERS/Brian Snyder
A woman pushes a baby stroller through a cloud of steam from a construction site in Boston, Massachusetts January 7, 2014. A deadly blast of arctic air that shattered decades-old records as it gripped the middle United States moved eastward on Tuesday, canceling thousands of flights, paralyzing road travel and closing schools and businesses. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

Colin Rankin, Canada's first test tube baby, is now a first-time father. But compared to him and his twin Gregory, whose births made swooping headlines 32 years ago, his baby Clark was conceived and born the old, traditional way.

"I had my 15 minutes of fame when I was born," Mr Rankin told the London Free Press.

Still nothing beats the excitement and ecstatic joy when he finally met baby Clark on Jan 28 who was born at 7 pounds and 12 ounces in a London hospital.

"This guy coming out, I mean it was the best moment of my life," Mr Rankin said.

Video Source: YouTube/ Wellcome Library

For Catherine Rankin, mother of Canada's first test tube babies, circumstances may have been different how her twins came into the world, still she shared the same feeling when her grandson Clark was born.

Only that at least her grandson can enjoy a simpler and quieter life.

The time Colin and Gregory were born on March 25, 1982, the media has hounded their every move, achievement, milestones, activities and much more.

"By the time they're old enough to know what the difference is and understand it, they won't be different. I hope there will be many, many babies born to people who couldn't have children by the method we used," Catherine said.

She said she feels great that many followed suit with their decision to undergo in vitro fertilisation.

Sarah Rankin, baby Clark's mother, just feels great that she and Colin were able to conceive the natural way.

"Fortunately, we were really lucky, in that we didn't have any issues. Very fortunate."

The proud and happy parents hope Clark won't be their first and last.

"Three or four, two or three...definitely more than one - give Clark a brother or sister," Sarah said.

Video Source: YouTube/ IVF India

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(Photo: / )
A woman pushes a baby stroller through a cloud of steam from a construction site in Boston, Massachusetts January 7, 2014. A deadly blast of arctic air that shattered decades-old records as it gripped the middle United States moved eastward on Tuesday, canceling thousands of flights, paralyzing road travel and closing schools and businesses. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
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