Australian Men Recruited for Breast Cancer Research; Wales Claim Highest Cancer Survival Rate

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By Reissa Su | February 4, 2014 6:47 PM EST

Top breast cancer experts are urging Australian men to sign up for cancer research which aims to reduce the recruitment time for studies.


Pink balloons are displayed in front of an artificial waterfall during the "Pink Ribbon" breast cancer awareness campaign at Cheonggye Stream in central Seoul October 5, 2011. (Reuters)

National Breast Cancer Foundation CEO Carole Renouf said that the traditional method for recruitment usually takes years which can deplete resources and delay research findings. The online research register known as Register4 will help speed things along from a span of two years to a matter of two days.

Ms Renouf stated she has seen a shift in research that covers different types of cancers. By setting up Register4, the research process will be accelerated for people who have cancer. Aside from Australian men and women who have cancer, healthy people are encouraged to register.

Sara Murdoch, one of the cancer foundation's patrons, was among the first to sign up for the online register in 2010. Ms Murdoch said the foundation enforces a strict privacy policy and research projects are screened ethically.

Cancer researchers will benefit from the online register as the database helps boost their studies.

Wales: highest cancer survival rate in UK

Meanwhile, Wales has the distinction of having the highest cancer survival rates in the UK, based on the results of the latest official report. The Welsh government released a report that although cancer survival rates are higher in Wales than other UK countries, the rates are still lower than the average in European countries for the common types of cancer.

As reported by Wales Online, Wales may be lagging behind European countries with cancers related to smoking having low outcomes across Europe. Only 13 per cent of people with lung cancer survive in Europe.

Cancer Research UK head of policy Sara Osborne said the Welsh report was "encouraging" but the improvements have to be made to ensure more people beat cancer. Ms Osborne said she is concerned about the low uptake of bowel screening. Bowel cancer can be treated successfully if a patient is diagnosed earlier.

The organisation is currently working with the government to improve early diagnosis so patients can seek effective treatment.

February 4 is World Cancer Day. Various organisations and support groups continue to spread cancer awareness and promote cancer research.

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Pink balloons are displayed in front of an artificial waterfall during the "Pink Ribbon" breast cancer awareness campaign at Cheonggye Stream in central Seoul October 5, 2011. (Reuters)
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