Super Bowl Commercials Attract More Canadians Than the Game Itself, Survey Reveals

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By Sounak Mukhopadhyay | February 3, 2014 4:47 PM EST

Sunday night Super Bowl attracts millions, but not everyone is intrigued by the game. For example, Canadians are more eager for the occasion for watching the commercials than enjoying the game - a recent survey reveals.

The Harris/Decima poll, which was conducted recently, revealed that 46 per cent Canadians are eager for Super Bowl mainly for the high profile commercials that run throughout. On the other hand, about one third of the population do watch it out of their love for the National Football League.

The twist in the tale, however, is that almost all the people who expressed their fascination for Super Bowl ads are not likely to skip the game to watch them. Around 45 per cent Canadians revealed that they would prefer watching the ads later online. They expressed their disinterest to miss the clash between the Seattle Seahawks and the Denver Broncos - CBC News reported.

According to Harris/Decima, the commercials have been able to attract even though who do not have any interest in the game. There is a certain group of people who are still not bothered about football or Super Bowl. One third of those people, on the contrary, are interested in checking out the commercials.

The survey, conducted over the telephone, asked 1,010 Canadian citizens between Jan 23 and Jan 27. The margin of error of the poll happens to be 3.1 per cent (19 out of 20 times).

Marketing experts, meanwhile, does not seem surprised to hear the results. They have always believed that the high profile commercials get more importance than the actual game itself. Interestingly, a research farm named Communicus conducted a study which revealed that 80 per cent of the commercials shown during the Super Bowl do not lead to purchase in reality - The News Hub reported.

Companies, on the other hand, spend US$4 million for a 30-second commercial in 2014, while they used to spend US $42,000 in 1967.

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