‘One By Two’ Review Roundup: Abhay Starrer More Like Sitcom than Film

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By Ankita Mehta | January 31, 2014 5:42 PM EST

Abhay Deol's starrer "One By Two" has received mixed reactions from commentators upon its release. The film, directed by Devika Bhagat, also stars Preeti Desai, Rati Agnihotri, Jayant Kriplani, Darshan Jariwala, Lilette Dubey and Smita Jaykar.

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One By Two

Most critics have rated the film poorly, giving it less than two stars. The film, a romantic comedy, features real-life couple, Abhay and Preeti, in lead roles.

The romantic comedy film is made on a budget of 15 crore and is released in limited 1000 screens in India.

Check out the reviews here:

Shubhra Gupta of Indian Express said: "The first half, where nothing happens over and over again, is a drag. Once you've set the scene, and introduced us to the characters, we need more. It's only post interval that the film gathers some momentum, and gives us a bit of drama, and reason to see it through.

"The other is the leading lady herself. Preeti Desai, Abhay Deol's real-life girlfriend, has an attractive presence, and does all right in scenes that don't demand much. But the moment she is asked for more, she falters. And given that she's meant to be a dancer who wants to make it to the top, (and the reason why so much of this film is shot like a TV dance competition show, which makes it more sit com than rom com) her dancing skills aren't great either.

"Abhay Deol can't hold it all by himself. He's mostly seen goofing off with his office pals, and looking a little too old for the foolery. 

"This is a case of missed opportunities. Trying for likeability is tough when the film is saddled with a listless plot and pace. And actors trying to lend it some heft, especially veterans like Rati Agnihotri and Jayant Kriplani, but not being able to because they don't get enough."

Deepanjana Pal of Firstpost said: "This is difficult for most Bollywood producers to believe, but there are actually those among us who are do not structure their Fridays around Salman Khan's newest release. Those people may have felt hope blossom in their heart when they saw this Friday's release is One By Two, starring indie darling Abhay Deol and directed by Devika Bhagat who wrote the screenplay for films like Manorama Six Feet Under, Ladies vs Ricky Bahl and Jab Tak Hai Jaan. For all those who thought this may be a promising combination, I have two letters for you: Ha!

"Here's what's truly disappointing about the non-masala Bollywood bandwagon that brings out films like One By Two. At least those who are out to make blockbusters give their audience what they want - Salman Khan roaring like a lion, Aamir Khan riding a bike that turns into a boat, forgettable heroines in barely-there clothing and so on.

"Filmmakers like Devika Bhagat and actors like Abhay Deol encourage audiences to expect something different from them. Then they go and borrow bits from existing works - fecal humour from Delhi Belly; an everyman hero who is constantly being heartbroken, like Ted from How I Met Your Mother; every other clichéd trope, from mousy Bengalis to friends who first snipe at each other and then become lovers. Films like One By Two are an attempt at a compromise between masala Bollywood and smart storytelling. Like so many compromises, it isn't fun and it's distasteful to both parties."

Mohar Basu of Koimoi.com said: "One By Two is a linear film that doesn't evoke anything from you at all. The stretched screenplay is tiresome, the lead actors are awfully boring, the dialogues were a flop show, the story was futile and utterly pointless and mostly even after a good first half of the film finished up, I was clueless about where the film is heading. I have admired Abhay Deol since Socha Na Tha but this was his most sub standard performance till date. You never expect such relentless rubbish from a fine actor like him and that remains the most disappointing bit of the film.

"It is hammy script with sloppy sequences which are starkly placed on intention and making no attempt to complement each other. The story is consecutive narration of one incident after another with none really making any sense or showing any remote co-relation with each other. It is harrowing to see problems being slapped on the face of two dismally dull protagonists, one after the other. There is no effort to draw any sympathy towards the characters which is frustrating because both Amit and Samara annoy you to bits, individually.

"When it is an Abhay Deol film you go in expecting quality, out-of-the-box endeavor but this time the actor strands you in middle of  one heck of a horrible film that suffers from loopy writing. There is a lack of emotion in the story and a lack of heart in the execution which makes the film such a shamefully bland one."

Saibal Chatterjee of NDTV said: "Halfway through One By Two, one minor character, a poetry-spouting police officer, mentions "inspiration ki hawa". This little film certainly could have done with much more of that rare commodity.

"There is no dearth of perspiration in screenwriter Devika Bhagat's directorial debut. She packs quite a lot into the film. Yet it feels wafer-thin. One By Two is a quirkily off-kilter romantic comedy that turns many a norm of the genre on its head.

"There are, among other things, a stolen DVD, a dance reality show, a voting process rendered topsy-turvy by hackers, a forgotten ditty that goes viral thanks to the efforts of a group of street dancers, and a fortuitous second chance that allows the heroine another shot at glory.

"The film does have its moments, but they are too few and far between to make a difference. Abhay Deol is saddled with a role that has no room for progression. So he sounds like a record stuck in a groove."

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