Vatican Approves Cartoonized ‘Super Pope’ Graffiti, Francis on February Rolling Stone Cover

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By Esther Tanquintic-Misa | January 30, 2014 5:37 PM EST

Pope Francis has been immortalized in a cartoonized graffiti found near the Vatican. No less than the latter approved its painting.


The cover of Time magazine's Person of the Year issue, featuring Pope Francis, is pictured in this December 11, 2013 handout photo. Time named Pope Francis its Person of the Year, crediting him with shifting the message of the Catholic Church while capturing the "imaginations of millions" who had become disillusioned with the Vatican. REUTERS/Time Inc./Handout via Reuters

— VaticanCommunication (@PCCS_VA) January 28, 2014

The man who rose to become the 266th heir to the throne of St Peter was depicted as flying with a clenched right fist, with papal cape fluttering in the wind and his left hand clutching a briefcase filled with "valores," or "values." A crucifix dangles from his neck.

Italian street artist Maupal did the graffiti that appeared on a wall in a cobble-stoned street near St Peter's Basilica, Vatican City.

On the same day, the Vatican Communications office tweeted the photo, Pope Francis emerged as the February cover of the magazine Rolling Stone.

Written as an in-depth profile, this is the very first time in the history of the Roman Catholic church and hierarchy that a spiritual leader, no less than the pope, will grace the cover of the music magazine.

"Francis, like Bill Clinton, thrives on personal contact, and he spends the better part of an hour greeting believers," Mark Binelli who wrote the cover story said. "He moves to greet the crowd. Benedict, a dour academic, kept this portion of the general audience to a minimum."

"Francis has consistently confounded expectations with the simplest of gestures: surprising desk clerks at the hotel where he'd been staying during the papal conclave by showing up to pay his own bill ... cracking up cardinals with jokes at his own expense hours after being elected (to those assembled at his first official dinner as pope, he deadpanned, 'May God forgive you for what you've done')."

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(Photo: / )
The cover of Time magazine's Person of the Year issue, featuring Pope Francis, is pictured in this December 11, 2013 handout photo. Time named Pope Francis its Person of the Year, crediting him with shifting the message of the Catholic Church while capturing the "imaginations of millions" who had become disillusioned with the Vatican. REUTERS/Time Inc./Handout via Reuters
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