Flirtatious Twitter Hashtag #Oomf Used 130,000 Times a Day - What Exactly Does it Mean?

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By Gopi Chandra Kharel | January 4, 2014 9:14 PM EST

There is a hashtag, still mysterious to many, sweeping across the social media, especially Twitter - #Oomf. Though it appears quite often in the micro-blogging site, many users still do not know what it means.

Twitter
The acronym has been used over 150 million times in twitter

The BBC decided to unravel the mystery in a television report on Friday. The notorious #Oomf simply means "One of my followers", an acronym used to refer to one of the persons following a Twitter user. It is mostly used to talk about a person without direct reference. The hastag is seen appearing especially in notorious and flirtatious tweets.

Take for example, when a man writes "So #oomf can tweet but not text back?", he is using the hastag to gain attention from a person, who is one of his followers but has not replied to his text message.

Read the cryptic and flirtatious reference in this tweet: "Me and #oomf would make a perfect couple".

"I like to be alone, but I would rather be alone with #oomf," another tweet says it all.

Some Twitter users post erotic pictures with a tweet that reads something like this: "#Oomf can this just be you & I? Please"

The BBC traced the first use of #Oomft to 2010, and since then the hashtag and the acronym has been used over 150 million times. It appears in Twitter 3.9 million times in a month. That means, someone tweets using this hashtag an average of 130,000 times a day.

Following are some of the eye-cathing usages of the notorious hashtag:

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(Photo: Twitter / )
The acronym has been used over 150 million times in twitter
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