Canada to Ban Incandescent Light Bulbs in 2014, Introduce Fresh Tax Measures

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By Sounak Mukhopadhyay | January 2, 2014 11:38 AM EST

Bulbs hang inside an electricity store in Madrid December 23, 2013.
Bulbs hang inside an electricity store in Madrid December 23, 2013.

The Conservative Canadian government has decided to ban incandescent light bulbs starting from 2014.

Canada seems to be learning from Australia which introduced a law to ban incandescent light bulbs back in 2007. Starting from November 2008, bulbs which did not comply with the minimum energy performance standards were banned from being imported to Australia. It completely banned the retail sale of such bulbs in November 2009.

Other countries that have already ordered restrictions on incandescent light bulbs include Venezuela and Brazil which initiated the movement in 2005. The European Union, Australia and Switzerland followed them in 2009. Argentina and Russia did it in 2012.

Canada has phased such bulbs out for more than two years now.  It has finally decided to go for a complete ban with effect from Jan 1, 2014. Canadians are encouraged to buy alternative bulbs which are far more energy efficient. Such alternatives include LED and CFL bulbs which, by the way, are sold for a higher price even though they save significantly more energy than the old-fashioned bulbs. Retailers are allowed to sell any incandescent bulb which they may still have in store, but manufacturers are not going to supply them with more such bulbs.

The New Year resolution of the Canadian government includes fresh tax measures which were announced in the previous federal budget. The new developments are expected to be applicable in the first week of the New Year. CBC reports that Canadian manufacturers are going to enjoy an extended tax break of two years when they purchase new machinery and equipment. According to Finance Minister Jim Flaherty, the extended tax-break will result in $1.4 billion concession for manufacturers in the country.

Employment insurance premiums are also expected to go through a 3-year freeze with effect from the first week of 2014. The maximum insurable earning in a year is going to increase from $47,000 to $48,600 this year. Any business which is caught hiding sales by using any particular software will be penalised for $5,000 for their first effort. Any such effort further will cost them $50,000 each. The possession and the development of such 'zapper' software will be fined up to $50,000 and $100,000, respectively.

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(Photo: REUTERS / )
Bulbs hang inside an electricity store in Madrid December 23, 2013.
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