Xbox One News: Beware of Hoax Backwards Compatibility Method That Ruins Xbox One; Developer Locked Out of ID@Xbox

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By Gel Galang | December 9, 2013 6:35 PM EST

Earlier reports on the Xbox One had warned users to avoid tinkering with the developer settings, which are included in the settings of Microsoft's next-gen console. There have already been reports of unwanted results, such as the possible malfunctioning of the device.

Now, a new report has surfaced, warning Xbox One users to avoid becoming one of the victims who have been tricked into ruining their Xbox One consoles with a tutorial hack that supposedly promises Xbox One backwards compatibility if you follow the instructions.

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Metro reports that an online poster has been making its rounds on the Internet, detailing a step-by-step guide to enable your Xbox One to play Xbox 360 games. What you get after that is a damaged Xbox One, with no repair in sight.

"By default, Xbox 360 backwards compatibility is disabled on Xbox One. To unlock it, follow these steps," said the poster. It goes on to provide a six-step procedure, which includes enabling the devkit settings and resetting some controls on the Xbox One.

Check out the Xbox One backwards compatibility hoax poster in the link above to see for yourself--but you've been warned to not follow it, lest you want a useless console in your hands.

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Microsoft responds to prank

Even Microsoft's Major Nelson has already responded to the hoax and warned people of its potential of destroying the Xbox One.

"To be clear there is no way to make your Xbox One backwards compatible & performing steps to attempt this could make your console inoperable," said Major Nelson on Twitter.

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Forbes adds that the developer kit settings on the Xbox one are not yet ready, which basically shows how flawed the supposed Xbox One backwards compatibility guide already is.

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Given how bricked consoles were a big problem even before this hacking guide, sending your bricked Xbox One after the experiment may prove to be useless in terms of Microsoft giving any sort of refund.

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Indie developer can't publish with ID@Xbox

Speaking of the developer settings on the Xbox One, there have been new developments with the ID@Xbox, and apparently, it's a fine print part of the program that can lock out a developer from participating in it.

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If you remember, the ID@Xbox was teased way back, after the flak of the first set of rules that Microsoft came out to accommodate the Xbox One indie game development scene. However, it took a lot longer for the Xbox One indie development program to come to fruition so other developers have already started their work on other platforms.

This is what happened to developer Witch Beam--according to iGameResponsibly, the ID@Xbox has a clause stating that there should be a launch parity between Xbox One and its competitors. But given that Witch Beam has already opted to avoid exclusivity deals that would delay Assault Android Cactus on the PS4, PC, and Wii U, they found themselves locked out of ID@Xbox.

Still, the report states that there is hope for other Witch Beam games to  come to the Xbox One, as the developer has been in talks with reps on the possibility of other games debuting with Xbox One.

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