Giant Tumour Weighing 25kg Taken Out from Spanish Woman's Womb

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By Christine Lazaro | December 6, 2013 12:19 PM EST

A 25kg tumour removed from a Spanish woman's womb makes a new record.

Yahoo Australia wrote that it took two hours for the giant tumour to be taken out of the womb of a 47-year-old Spanish woman. The surgery for the removal of the benign tumour took place at Torrevieja Hospital, located in Valencia, Spain.

According to the head doctor, Eduardo Cazorla, the case of the giant tumour was a first in his entire 20-year-career. Other published cases of such massive tumours went as big as 11.3 kg and there were only about five recorded cases of it. The Spanish woman had a big cystic tumour which measured 41cm in length that it stretched from her pubic bone and to her sternum.

The details of the surgery included having to remove the womb and ovaries of the patient to conduct a complete hysterectomy. The Spanish woman was referred to the said hospital by their family doctor. Before the surgery, it was reported that she complained of extreme weight gain within her torso area that rendered her utmost discomfort. She also complained of bowel problems along with having difficulties breathing and a lot of discomfort every time she's walking.

The complete recovery of the patient happened after a total of five days stay in the hospital and three weeks of rest.

The Medicalopedia Web site wrote an article that featured other top three giant tumours recorded in the books. A 23 kg tumour was taken out from a woman's womb in Buenos Aires. According to the surgeon who handled it, the tumour has almost the same weight as of an average 4-year-old.

Another is the 198lb tumour taken out from the leg of a 32-year-old guy from Vietnam. His operation lasted for a total of 12 hours and removed on Jan 5, 2012. Lastly, there's the 300lb tumour removed from another female's abdomen. The surgery done on the 34-year-old woman took place in Stanford Hospital in California in October 1991.

Digital Journal added that the latest case of the Spanish woman was followed up by regular visits of the patients to make sure that there will be no signs of any recurrence of the tumour.


(Video Credit: YoUTube/Carl Mullen)


(Video Credit: YouTube/msvf2)

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