Autumn Statement 2013: Britons to Work Longer as State Pension Age Rise Brought Forward

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By Ian Silvera | December 6, 2013 12:01 AM EST

Osborne confirmed the basic state pension will be uprated by the triple guarantee (Reuters)

The Chancellor George Osborne has said the date the state pension age rises to 68 will be brought forward to the mid-2030s.

Osborne's announcement comes during the Autumn Statement 2013.

The Chancellor also disclosed that the state pension age could increase further to 69 by the late 2040s.

In addition, Osborne confirmed the basic state pension will be uprated by the triple guarantee: the higher of earnings, inflation or 2.5%.

The move means in April 2014 the basic State Pension will rise by 2.7% - representing a £2.95 rise, according to the government.

The chancellor also said the standard minimum income guarantee in pension credit will rise by the same amount as the cash increase in the basic state pension.

The Chancellor also confirmed winter fuel payments will no longer be payable to people living in an European Economic Area country with an average winter temperature higher than that in the warmest region of the UK from winter 2015-206.

Energy Prices

Osborne also branded the Labour Party's promise to fix energy prices if it wins the general election in 2015, a "con".

As part of the Autumn Statement, the Chancellor said that "we are tackling energy costs by being transparent and not by conning consumers that we are able to control oil prices."

"Instead, we are planning to roll-back on levies that the previous government installed which will in turn support the lowest income families because it will not add a penny to the taxpayer's bill.

"My political philosophy is to tackle this by not penalising people with more taxes and regulation. Going green doesn't have to cost the earth."

In September, opposition leader Ed Miliband pledged to freeze energy prices until 2017, if the Labour Party wins the general election in two years.

His suggestion was heavily criticised by the government and energy firms, who claimed it would lead to blackouts and halt much-needed investment in the country's creaking infrastructure.

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