Kim Dotcom Pushes for New Zealand 'First World Internet', Backs Orcon

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By Reissa Su | October 3, 2013 3:38 PM EST

Kim Dotcom has announced his support for Orcon to bring cheaper broadband service to New Zealand.  The Mega founder and Internet millionaire said he agrees with Orcon's mission to provide customers with unlimited broadband service. 

Mr Dotcom said that New Zealand's bandwidth is forty times more costly than Europe.  The current bandwidth is not costing ordinary customers more money, it also affects the economy because it limits company actions. 

Kim Dotcom and Orcon have launched a campaign to urge broadband competitors to introduce lower prices and data caps. The campaign will include a television advertisement to establish a "first world Internet" for New Zealanders.

Orcon Chief Executive Greg McAlister said the Kiwis were considered to be at the bottom of the OECD broadband tables along with Iceland and Australia where data caps were concerned despite New Zealand's investment in a national fibre broadband service.

Orcon has already joined others that have committed to using the proposed Hawaiki trans-Pacific cable. Aside from Orcon, Australian ISP iiNet has also pledged to help increase competition on the country's international links. 

In Auckland, Kim Dotcom told reporters that New Zealand is "in a trap" with expensive international  bandwidth prices which big businesses often avoid.  Reducing costs will be the only way to attract big companies and eliminate data caps ordinary consumers face. 

Mr Dotcom reiterated his passion for changing what he thinks is wrong in New Zealand.  He described the current Internet connectivity of New Zealand as "third world."

Aside from announcing his support for Orcon, Mr Dotcom also told reporters that he planned to create a political party with a mission to provide cheaper Internet access for all. He mentioned the GCSB bill and the privacy issues that people have been dealing with. 

Mr Dotcom told the media that he wanted new laws in place to protect Internet freedom and the basic human right of privacy.

His political plans revolve around New Zealand's future in the digital age. Mr Dotcom hopes the Internet will be the biggest driver of jobs for Kiwis.

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