Aussies Anticipate 2015 ANZAC Centenary Celebration in Gallipoli

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By Vittorio Hernandez | April 22, 2013 1:02 PM EST

The number of Australians who would visit Gallipoli this week for Anzac Day celebration on Thursday, April 25, is expected to be down since many Aussies prefer to celebrate big the event in 2015, the centenary of the commemoration.

Matt McLachlan, head of Battlefield Tours, said that because of this development, bookings for Anzac Day in Gallipoli would remain stable until 2014, in contrast to the 10 go 15 per cent growth rates the past few years.

The maximum number of people who could attend the Dawn Service at North Beach is capped at 10,500, made up of 8,000 Australians, 2,000 New Zealanders and 500 additional official guests. There are speculation the 500 would give preference to the 200 living widows of the World War I veterans.

 These 8,000 are Aussies who are successful in a government ballot, while the rest could participate in other special commemorative events on the Dardanelles peninsula.

Only 10 to 20 per cent of attendees at the Gallipoli service yearly fly from Australia, the rest are usually young backpackers or people who live in the UK.

Mr McLachlan said beyond the anticipated 100th year celebration, Battlefield Tours is now accepting bookings for anniversary celebrations in France in 2016, 2017 and 2018.

Ahead of April 25, 2015, the Department of Veterans' Affairs and Turkish authorities locked the fate toward the beach to avert a possible stampede.

However, there is a question why is Australia celebrating the event when it lost in its most famous and costly battle. The Sydney Morning Herald blamed this outlook to reporting by censored war correspondent Charles Bean which made it appear that the failed invasion was a triumph.

Aussies only found out the truth when Prime Minister Andrew Fisher sent journalist Keith Murdoch in September 1915 and found out that the landing failed miserably and thousands were killed for little gain. About 12,000 Anzacs died together in Gallipoli.

A movie about Gallipoli with the same title was made in 1981, featuring Mel Gibson. Here is the official trailer of the film.

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