Michael Rasmussen: Another Cyclist Confesses to 12 Years of Doping

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By Gilda Galang | February 1, 2013 3:15 PM EST

It's looking to be a season of confessions for the sport of cycling as riders are coming to the light one by one bearing confessions to doping.

Following Lance Armstrong's very public confession after years of denying doping and Sydney Morning Herald's report on Rabobank member Thomas Dekker's statement on the names of those who supplied him with drugs, Danish cyclist Michael Rasmussen steps into the confession hot seat in a press conference, reports USA Today.

The Dane rider confessed to 12 years of doping to his name, but is said to be in full cooperation with the US Anti-Doping Agency regarding his use of performance enhancers.

Among the performance users that Rasmussen admitted to using include blood transfusions, insulin, human growth hormone, EPO, and cortisone, reports Telegraph.

One of his earlier falls from grace includes being thrown off the Tour de France back in 2007, according to The Australian. Here, it was not even clear on what the truth behind the incident was. Originally, it had been reported that he had lied to cover up marital infidelity.

Due to the confession, the Sydney Morning Herald reports that Rasmussen's sentence may result in lessening two years to his supposed eight-year ban. However, he has fully retired, and the only cycling publicity that he may see would be his stint as an endorser promoting clean sport, as per his team sponsors' plan.

During his career, Rasmussen has always been cleared during tests, but was forced to serve a two-year suspension for the 2007 incident that threw him out of the Tour, and led to a showdown for Cadel Evans and Alberto Contador.

Rasmussen had once conquered the Mountain Bike World Championships in 1999, reports BBC. But what seems to be clear now is that this confession is the nail on the coffin of Rasmussen's cycling career at 39.

"I have told the anti-doping authorities all of this," Rasmussen said to The Australian. "From today, my cycling career is over, I want to co-operate with Danish institutions. I know I cheated and cheated on other riders and I will accept my punishment."

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