Nolan Daniels: Beware of Facebook User's $1 Million Hoax -- Two Million 'Shares' Don't Make it Real

  • Rate this Story
  • 0
  • 0

By Arlene Paredes | December 3, 2012 3:28 PM EST

Facebook user Nolan Daniels (not necessarily his real name) on Friday claimed winning $239 million Powerball money, and shared a photoshopped photo - supposedly of himself - with the winning lottery ticket. He encouraged users to share the photo. In return, he would give a million dollars to a random user.

"Looks like I won't be going to work EVER!!!! Share this photo and I will give a random person 1 million dollars!" The photo caption says.

You know how it usually goes: If something sounds too good to be true, you better not waste your time. But 2 million Facebook users shared the photo, anyway. Forty-nine thousand users 'liked' the photo, which has been commented over 25 thousand times.

Here are some of the Facebook comments:

Lol at photoshopped 46 to look like a 16 - Brandon Wolfe

If these people dont know how to fact check, I fear they may be a little far off from a gr.3 math lesson. - Topher J Rempel

Some comments include links to reports from Gawker ("Fake Winning Powerball Ticket Goes Viral on Facebook Proving Once Again That Facebook Users Will Share") and Huffinton Post ("Nolan Daniels Powerball Hoax: Man Posts Fake Lottery Ticket To Facebook").

The Gawker report told readers the numbers on the fake ticket were "not in numerical order," which is how legitimate tickets are printed out. The web site also described the ticket image to be "poorly photoshopped."

Gawker also reported a couple in Missouri and another buyer in Arizona won the Powerball.

Despite some comments wishing to inform other users of the hoax, new visitors to the Facebook page are still buying the hoax.

Nolan Daniels' Facebook page remains active up to this point. Users do not lose anything by sharing the image. But it is annoying for many of those who believe users like Daniels should not be given time and attention. For others, Daniels' act reveals how gullible some people could be, and how everyone should be warned about hoaxes of many kinds on social media.

To contact the editor, e-mail:

  • Rate this Story
  • 0
  • 0
This article is copyrighted by IBTimes.com.au, the business news leader

Join the Conversation

IBTimes TV
E-Newsletters

We value your privacy. Your email address will not be shared.