Melted Portion of Arctic Ice Larger Than the Size of United States

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By Jenalyn Villamarin | December 2, 2012 10:44 AM EST

The United Nations Weather Agency confirmed that a portion of the Arctic Ice melted with a size area larger than the United States.

The World Meteorological Organization (WMO) also stated at the climate talks in Doha that the 2012 Arctic ice melt is one of the numerous weather events to occur on planet Earth.

The reported ice melt from the month of March to September was an astounding 11.83 million square kilometers which is greater than the area of the United States.

"The alarming rate of its melt this year highlighted the far-reaching changes taking place on Earth's oceans and biosphere. Climate change is taking place before our eyes and will continue to do so as a result of the concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, which have risen constantly and again reached new records," Michel Jarraud, WMO Secretary-General, stated.

This awful climate news drastically strengthened the global warming issues. In a conducted study, a group of scientists examined the data gathered to conclude on how much ice loss there was in Greenland and Antarctica. Results showed that the ice sheets covering Greenland and Antarctica are now melting three times as much ice yearly as they did back in the 1990s.

Annually, Greenland and Antarctica drop approximately 344 billion tons of ice and these ice melts increase the sea-level at around 1 millimeter. Since 1992, the team of scientists declared that the trend has already contributed 11 millimeters which is an estimated 20% of the total sea-level increase.

Scientists further added that it will take years to widen models that can calculate how fast sea levels will rise by the end of the century.

"It remains unclear if such losses will decline or will level off or will accelerate further. The melting needs monitoring to further understand the ice sheet processes leading to the change," Ian Joughin, a glaciologist at the University of Washington in Seattle, declared.

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