Pakistan Insists Aussie Sheep Were Culled According to Islamic Practice

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By Vittorio Hernandez | October 3, 2012 4:46 PM EST

Pakistan denied a published report last week that some of the 21,000 imported Australian sheep suspected of carrying the salmonella bacteria and ordered culled by Karachi authorities were killed in a brutal manner.

The News International, a newspaper based in Karachi, claimed that untrained workers stabbed and clubbed the animals to death, while some of the sheep were buried alive. The newspaper based its report on mobile phone video shots of the culling.

Roshan Shaikh, top administrative official of Karachi, pointed out that only one sheep suffered from improper cutting of its throat. He attributed it to human error and not a deliberate act.

"We have slaughtered the sheep in the Islamic manner and duly buried them deep in trenches ensuring that they could not cause danger to human population or animals," The Sydney Morning Herald quoted Mr Shaikh.

Reports of the inhumane and brutal manner the sheep were culled caused outrage in Australia.

Due to the controversy generated by the rejection of Bahrain of the shipment and the alleged brutal way Pakistan killed the livestock, groups called for an end to Australia's $1-billion-a-year live export trade which employs about 10,000 people.

Animals Australia reported on Tuesday that family-friendly rallies against the live export trade were held on Saturday in Fremantle, Melbourne, Brisbane, Canberra, Sydney and Adelaide. The group threatened not to vote for Australian politicians who would favour the live export trade.

"The overwhelming sentiment in the community in light of the further dreadful suffering in Pakistan is 'enough is enough.' No amount of excuses or profit can justify our continued involvement in live animal export," Animal Australia said in a statement.

Fresh laboratory tests are being made on the animals upon the order of the Sindh High Court which on Saturday stop the culling of the Australian sheep.

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