'Mass Effect 3' Ending Controversy: DLC to Fix Ending this Summer

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By Vinod Yalburgi | April 6, 2012 5:21 PM EST

EA has finally responded to fans clamouring for a meaningful ending, with the announcement of a free DLC (in the form of Extended Cut) to be released this summer. The ending for the third installment of the game just bombed at the climax, failing to meet the expectations of a majority of fans and even sparking off a heated debate and speculation concerning the tame ending.

The inconsequential ending seems to mock at the decisions taken by the player in due course of the epic game spanning three installments, where the players assuming Commander Shepard's role are forced to make endless compromises at every step. Not to forget the huge fan-following that the franchise beholds, EA and BioWare find themselves cornered with overwhelming protest from fans seeking a new ending for the critically acclaimed trilogy of video games.

Despite disappointed fans seeking a new ending, BioWare is sticking to the original conclusion and rather tries to reveal miniscule details of the ending. According to a press release on Business Wire, the downloadable content pack will feature additional cinematic sequences and epilogue scenes.

"The DLC aims to give fans seeking further clarity to the ending of Mass Effect 3 deeper insights into how their personal journey concludes," states the press release. To sum it up in simple words, the proposed DLC or Extended Cut will feature the same conclusion as before, but, just explained in greater detail.

"Since launch, we have had time to listen to the feedback from our most passionate fans and we are responding. With the Mass Effect 3: Extended Cut we think we have struck a good balance in delivering the answers players are looking for while maintaining the team's artistic vision for the end of this story arc in the Mass Effect universe," Dr Ray Muzyka, Co-Founder of BioWare, explains.

The DLC announcement has drawn mixed response. Those upset with the insipid ending are resorting to various campaigns to express their anger and disappointment over the game's ending to BioWare and EA, even as some believe the DLC provides only a respite and not a true fix.  

All those who never had any problems with the ending are bracing up to face the eventual backlash towards the inconclusive DLC as well. It is unlikely that the antagonised fans would forgive EA and BioWare, no matter if the DLC is served free at this point.

The game developers have come under heavy fire in recent times, as online forums and blogs are filled with hate messages for the game. No wonder that EA is being voted as the worst company in America, in a poll conducted by The Consumerist.

The poll result may be ascribed to a variety of factors, including EA's poor customer service, their blatant DRM schemes, formation of the universally panned Origin distribution platform, and their support for SOPA. But still, many believe it is the Mass Effect 3 controversy that is the tipping point.

"We're sure that British Petroleum, AIG, Philip Morris, and Halliburton are all relieved they weren't nominated this year. We're going to continue making award-winning games and services played by more than 300 million people worldwide," John Reseburg, EA's senior director of corporate communications, told Kotaku on being voted the worst company in the country.

Now, for some good news, Extended Cut is coming this summer on all three platforms - Xbox 360, PS3 and PC and above all it will be free. Maybe that seems the only resort for EA and BioWare to restore some lost pride and passion with the controversial game.  

MUST READ: 'Mass Effect 3' Patch: BioWare Offers Fix for Crashes, Shepard Face Import Bug [COMPLETE FIX-LIST]

MUST READ: 'Mass Effect 3' Ending Controversy: DLC Will Not Affect Finale Says EA, 58% 'Hate' Game's Conclusion Asserts Survey

MUST READ: 'Mass Effect 3' Ending Controversy: How to Get the Best Possible Ending and the Missing Pieces? [SPOILERS]

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