Teens Get Smarter as They Age, Especially the Older Ones

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October 4, 2011 11:36 PM EST

Parents need not worry on the mental advancement of their teens as a U.S. study showed that adolescence actually breeds more excellence, thanks much to years of learning and experience.

Results of a research work published on September by the medical journal Psychological Science pointed to suggestions that regular teens, with sufficient stimulus and nutrition, are bound to undergo mental faculty enhancement.

As they grow, however complex their experiences were, teenagers tend to get smarter and faster on their mental capabilities as shown by the University of Texas (in San Antonio) research findings, in which youngsters from the age bracket of 13 to 17 have been observed to display keen developments in analysis and intelligence.

According to HealthDay News, test results from some 7000 teenage participants proved that age affords gradual advancements in three major mental disciplines, which involved problem solving, mathematical computations and vocabulary usage and retention.

In all the 12 examinations administered to all age brackets, researchers learned that older teenagers routinely beat out their younger counterparts, suggesting that level of intelligence jumps with advancing age.

The study concluded that there is only one explanation about the overall result: Older teenagers think much faster than the younger ones, who in turn will eventually acquire the same capability as they age.

Active and sufficiently-encouraged teenagers, the study said, are bound to enhance their ability to process and deal with stimulating brain-related tasks such as opening up their minds on new and compelling information.

As teenagers absorb new data and figure their way around them, their 'intuitive sense' dramatically gears up in consistent and increasing levels, making it easier and quicker for them to address mental issues thrown in their way, the study asserted.

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